LESSON NO.3 ON BECOMING A WRITER – Knowing Your Audience Really IS Important

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I made a writing mistake today.  I posted this on Facebook…

The Town

I really just wanted people to listen to this Macklemore song I thought was pretty great.  I’ve been having a pretty hard time in life lately, and so I was just really excited when I found this song on Spotify today.  It really made my day you know…it made me feel so much better than I’d been feeling, so much more hopeful.  So I guess I just wanted to share that with others…

I was just so excited about it that I forgot, no matter what, you still always must remember as a writer, who your audience is.  No matter what, it matters.  And Facebook reminded me today, when nobody decided to respond.  It hurt.  I mean, in a way it’s kind of just a silly little example – and yet it’s funny, because as silly and/or little it may seem to be, the lack of response still stung me.  It was just so personal to me…it really meant something to me you know?  But that’s the thing about writing, and I guess about speaking too (as I’m quickly finding out in my endeavor to make a difference), and really just any kind of sharing with other people in life I suppose…

You have to remember who your audience is.

But I think it’s especially important for us writers though, because what we write is so personal (or at least, in many a case it is), it matters to us.  I suppose in a way then, it’s like a writer’s tool for self-preservation.  What we write matters to us, because otherwise we wouldn’t take the time to sit down and write it.  It matters.

And so I suppose that’s it, the point of this post:  I just wanted to share so you hopefully don’t ever have to feel the sting I’ve been harboring today.  An audience responds when they can relate, good or bad, they must be able to relate in some way, some way that matters to them too.  That’s what connects us…I hate to say it, but it’s self-interest.  Really, though, to put it in a lighter sense of the term – we all have different messages we want to get across.  It seems to me, now, as a growing writer, that the key in making a difference is to find and use first, what we have in common.  Only then, once we’ve found some way to connect together, can we begin to bridge the gap in between.